Pre-Qualificiation

Add A Personal Touch When Submitting Your Offer

Business women hands working writing notebook on wooden desk, lighing effect

Business women hands working writing notebook on wooden desk, lighing effectJust because you have your eye on a property and have been shown around the premises by a professional real estate agent, it does not mean that you will be the only person interested in submitting an offer. In fact, there could be multiple people making an offer at the same time, which is why it is imperative that your offer really stands out!

It is rare for a buyer to offer the seller the asking price, with most buyers putting their haggling skills to the test in order to land their dream home for a desirable price. So, how can you peak the seller’s curiosity and improve your chances of receiving a positive response?

Capture the seller’s attention with a personal letter. A traditional tactic that has not lost its touch, personal letters can make you stand out among a sea of bidders.

How to Write the Perfect Personal Letter

Including a personal letter with your offer is known to help get an offer accepted. Below, we discuss the three main points to include in your letter:

  • Personal Information - Opening up to the seller will strike a chord with them. It will help them to get to know you, without even meeting you. Furthermore, it will allow them to make a choice based on who they would (ideally) like to transfer home ownership to. Including personal information in your offer letter that is related to your profession, your pets (if any), and your family size will make your offer stand out. Plus, the inclusion of personal information will prove to the seller that you are a serious and honest buyer.
  • Express Emotion - Connecting with the seller on an emotional level can be a challenge, but if you accomplish it, the chances of your offer being accepted are far greater. Perhaps you have decided to buy a new home so that you can use the leftover expenses to fund a relative’s surgery or a child’s college education? Maybe you want to relocate as a way of feeling safer in the neighborhood? Whatever your reason(s) for wanting to buy a particular property, don’t be afraid to express emotion in your letter.
  • Show Appreciation - It is nice to be nice! Even if the seller already has someone else in mind, this doesn’t mean that they don’t deserve some gratitude. After all, they invited you into their home and took the time to read your letter, right? Be polite and you never know – the seller could change their mind and accept your offer over someone else’s.

When you realize the difference a personal offer letter could make to your chances of being accepted for a property purchase, you won’t want to approach a seller without writing a letter ever again! A well-written letter that demonstrates your suitability for the house can be read over and over by the seller, thus enabling them to make an informed decision. After all, it is their pride and joy they are selling, so they won’t be willing to hand the keys over to just anybody.

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How to Understand the Impact of your Debt-to-Income Ratio and How It Affects the Loan Process

Businessman's hands with calculator and cost at the office and F

Businessman's hands with calculator and cost at the office and FGearing up for a loan application can stir up a mixture of emotions, from euphoria to anxiety about the entire process. All that is required for a plain sailing experience is knowledge on the subject and in particular, on the topic of debt-to-income (DTI) ratios. Many loan applicants will be unaware of the fact that this is considered by a lender before the applicant is accepted for a loan.

What is considered a good debt-to-income ratio?

Dividing your total gross income with your recurring monthly debt is the easiest way to understand what your DTI income ratio is. Once you are aware of this, you can take a step forward and arrange a meeting with a lender. By doing so, you can discuss your loan options and talk about whether your DTI is good or could do with some improvement.

The Negative Impact on Financing

Put it this way: if a lender looks at a borrower who has a DTI of 50% or above, you are instantly in the red. In many cases, they will not give you a second look since you will be deemed “dangerous” in their strict book of lending. This can make it a struggle to obtain financing. On a brighter note, there are multiple lending options out there now that consider applicants with a poor credit history and DTI.

Tips for Being Approved for a Loan

Fear not if you fall into the red category when it comes to calculating DTI because it does not mean that your chances of loan approval have gone completely out the window. In fact, the following tips could actually teach you how to handle your finances overall:

– Pay off any debts you have accrued.

– Reduce your DTI by paying in affordable amounts.

– If you are able, settle high-interest debts.

– Stop spending so much and start saving more.

– Write a monthly budget and stick to it.

– Cut off direct debits or subscriptions that you no longer require.

Improving the Debt-to-Income Ratio

Sit down and really get stuck into your finances. It will be worth it when you get one step closer to being accepted for a loan, despite having a low DTI at the beginning. Pay attention to the higher debts on your list, if possible. Paying off larger amounts faster will ensure that your credit rating boost at a quicker rate. This will also lift that credit rating arrow from the red spot to the amber or, if you really commit, close to the green.

There are plenty of ways in which you can improve your DTI, prior to applying for a loan. This will boost your chances of acceptance and will have a positive effect on your credit score as a whole. Take it upon yourself to perform a recalculation of your DTI every month, as this will paint a clearer picture of how your financial situation is changing, for the better!

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How Much Home Can You Afford?

paramount-equity-money-on-trees

How Much Home can you AffordWhen you are ready to get involved in the real estate market, figuring out how much you can afford is one of the most important parts of the process. Many people go into the process of buying a house with unrealistic expectations. They think that they can buy a mansion on a minimum wage salary, and end up disappointed. Other people end up getting a house that is more than they can afford and it cripples them financially. How much home can you afford? There are a few different ways to find out.

Get Pre-Qualified

One of the best things that you can do in this situation is get pre-qualified with a mortgage lender. Almost every mortgage lender offers this type of service for customers. To get pre-qualified, you will simply need to answer some general questions for a loan officer at the mortgage lender. (more…)

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Home Loans: Pre-Approval vs Pre Qualification

paramount equity pre-qualify

Pre Approved vs. PrewualifiedWhen buying a house with a mortgage, you have the opportunity to get the process started before you actually need a loan. Most banks offer the ability to get pre qualified or get pre-approved. While these two processes are similar, they are actually not the same thing and will provide you with different benefits.

Home Loans: Pre-Approval vs Pre Qualification

The big difference between pre-approval and pre qualification in the mortgage industry is in the level of fact checking that goes on. With a pre-qualification, you do not provide any specific details that can be verified by the mortgage lender. It is a very non-committal process that basically just tells you how much you can borrow. With this approach, you tell the mortgage lender about how much money you make and what your credit history is. Then the mortgage lender (more…)

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